Dolpopa

Dolpopa's Song of Auspiciousness in Translation

We are happy to make a new translation of a song of auspiciousness by Dolpopa available to download and share. jf_dolpopa_lineage field_01.jpg The newest contribution to the Jonang Foundation online library is a translation by James Rutke of Dolpopa Sherab Gyaltsen’s song, translated as, Buddha Nature’s Auspiciousness . What Dolpopa has done in this song is deconstruct the common Tibetan expression “Tashi Delek” ( bkra shis bde legs ), turning it into an uncommon expression of auspiciousness by interpreting the phrase in the...

New Texts and Catalog of the Dolpopa Collection

An annotated listing of each Tibetan title in the 2011 edition of Dolpopa's Collected Writings is attached below, including a list of the thirteen titles that are not included in either of the Dzamthang editions.

In compiling this, the source statement for each text was translated and included. This indicates whether the particular text is based primarily on newly available sources or solely on the Dzamthang blockprint edition, which is in turn based primarily on the Dzamthang manuscript edition. The Dzamthang manuscript edition did not become available to the outside world until 1992. The Dzamthang blockprint edition followed several years later. The 2011 edition...

Dolpopa's Collected Writings New Edition

A new edition of the Tibetan language collected writings ( gsung ’bum ) of Dolpopa was published in 13 volumes in 2011, though it did not become available until 2013. It was published in China in western style book format (paperbound).

jf_dol po pa gsung 'bum.jpg Dolpopa’s collected writings first became available to the world outside Tibet in 1992 with the publication of The ’Dzam-thang Edition of the Collected Works (gsung ’bum) of Kun-mkhyen Dol-po-pa Shes-rab-rgyal-mtshan...

Finding the Original Jonang Monastery

The Jonangpa have longstanding historical and cultural ties to locality. [1] So much so that their very identity is derived from and enmeshed within their place of origin. The term “Jonang” is an abbreviation of “Jomonang,” the name of the valley where the first Jonangpas settled. [2]

Jonang historical texts as well as biographies of early Jonangpa masters reference this first settlement simply as, "Jonang Monastery" ( jo nang dgon pa ). These sources specify this as the founding site of the Jonang tradition.

Where Dolpopa Sherab Gyaltsen (1292-1361) lived and constructed the...

Kalachakra on Tibet Pilgrimage

jf_kalachakra_buton.jpg Buton's Kalachakra Statue, Zhalu

At Jonang Foundation, we host pilgrimages to power places in Tibet. These pilgrimages are fundraisers for our educational and preservation initiatives. The summer 2011 journey was the second of its kind and included stops at several of the most significant sites for the practice of the Kalachakra in Tibet. During the 2009 pilgrimage, Tulku Zangpo Rinpoche performed a Jonang Kalachakra empowerment at the base of the Jonang Stupa. The summer 2013 pilgrimage will continue along route...

Dolpopa on Emptiness

The following post is titled, Emptiness of Self-nature and Emptiness of Other by Cyrus Stearns, a contributing author to the Jonangpa blog. It is an excerpt from the reprint of The Buddha from Dolpo (Snow Lion Publications, 2010). Posted here with permission from the author. [1]

The key in Dolpopa Sherab Gyaltsen's approach is to link his view of the absolute as empty only of other relative phenomena ( gzhan stong ) to the teachings of the Kṛtayuga, as opposed to the teachings of the Tretāyuga and later eons that emphasize even absolute reality is empty of self-nature ( rang stong...

Reflecting 'The Crystal Mirror'

Maybe its the dark magnetism of impending all hallows' eve, but I'm feeling a mischievous urge to rile up all the ghouls and goblins of unapologetic dogmatism and have them stare in unison — — into The Crystal Mirror . That is, The Crystal Mirror of Philosophical Systems by Thuken Losang Chökyi Nyima (1737-1802). Fortunately, this classical Tibetan polemical text is now available to the English reading world due to the clear translation of Geshe Lhundup Sopa and the lucid editing of Roger Jackson under the umbrella of The Library of Tibetan Classics series (Wisdom Publications, '09). [1]

Though the earliest attempt to translate...

Rongton’s Praise to Dolpopa

Over the summer, I was browsing through a Tibetan book shop and I happened upon the recently reproduced collected works of Rongton Shakya Gyaltsen (1367-1449). As I opened the first volume to look at the table of contents, my eyes were drawn to the title, A Praise to the Great Omniscient Dolpopa Sherab Gyaltsen . [1]

Rongton was a fascinating figure whose writings have not received much attention by western scholars to date. He was the founder of Nalendra Monastery located north of Lhasa, the seat of the Nalendrapa sub-order of the Sakya tradition. Among his numerous teachers were Sonam Zangpo...

At the Great Stupa of Jonang

The following is a transcript of a talk, The Legacy of the Jonangpa by Michael Sheehy at the Great Stupa of Jonang in Tibet on July 17, 2009.

Jonang stupa_0539.jpg Great Stupa at Jonang, '09

So, the actual name of this place is Jomonang, which is the name of the valley. [1] It is named "Jomonang" because the female local protector deity here is known as Jomo Ngag Gyalmo, who is said to live in the upper ridge right...

Tsoknyi Gyatso on Zhentong

Without jumping the gun (as we continue to set the text), I thought to write a post with the hope to help contextualize a forthcoming publication in the Tibetan language on the essential zhentong works by the Jonang master from Dzamthang, Ngawang Tsoknyi Gyatso (1880-1940). [1]

Zhentong — the contemplative view that the ultimate nature of reality is empty of all extraneous superficial characteristics while profusely full of the qualities that define enlightenment — has become a hallmark of the Jonang tradition of Tibetan Buddhism. From its early articulation by Tibetan forefathers of the Jonangpa in the eleventh century, up to Dolpopa Sherab...

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